Eichstätt Courier, 29th September, 2008

Moving piece of rococo - Oscar Wilde's fairy tale in danced form

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Eichstätt (mkh) – It is not very well known that Oscar Wilde also wrote fairy tales. One of them has been presented in the framework of the final program of Hortus Wander Wunder Kammer Project. The dancers, Eiko Hayashi and Sayuri Tronsberg, (both in Munich) performed Wilde’s “the nightingale and the rose“ in a beautiful and felicitous way to the atmospheric piano music composed by Paul Amrod at the mirror hall of the magnificent Resident. (…) By means of the vocabulary of choreography, both dancers expressed the ideas and emotions of the Wilde’s tale such as devotion, disappointment, vanity and sacrifice. Hayashi and Tronsberg complemented perfectly in a gracious as well as marvelous way. (…) In Eichstätt, the piece was performed for the second time after its premiere at the Gasteig theatre in Munich last year. It was a successful ending of the Hortus project, or, as an enthusiastic spectator expressed, it was like a moving piece of rococo at the marvelous mirror hall.

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Süddeutsche Zeitung, 25th September 2006
Neuroses in a mega city – Tokyo in Black Box

(…) Katrin Schaftiel and the classic ballet dancer Sayuri tronsberg follow the fluent movemements of steps of the Kabuki dancer, Eiko Hayashi, dressed in a bloody red Kimono. (…) In this way, the evening became a continuous trip between Kabuki citations and postmodern city neuroses (…). Silvia Stammen

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Münchner Merkur, 23rd September 2006
East-West-Contrast – Dance theater Tokyo in Black Box

Eiko Hayashi, with long black hair over the fire-red costume, interprets wonderfully this flattering servility with the styled dance gestures of the Kabuki theatre. The choreographer was lucky (to have) the stage presence of this professional Kabuki dancer. (…). Malve Grading

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Mainichi Shimbun (japanese Newspaper), 2nd April 2003
Fuji-Musume (wistaria girl), danced in Vienna
Hitomoyou (arabesques)

(…) Nevertheless, the artist believes that the elegance of the Japanese dance and the cry of the soul as a catharsis of the oppressed mourning could find its equivalent in German speaking culture. (…) Eiko Hayashi-Kopitz developed the concept to combine the Japanese dance with European music (Crossover). (…) Eiko Hayashi-Kopitz (…) would like to try further more possibilities to express the Japanese aesthetic in connection with European music and to find the interface of Japanese and European cultures. Satoshi Fukui